Example: Pandas Excel output with an autofilter

An example of converting a Pandas dataframe to an Excel file with a autofilter, and filtered data, using Pandas and XlsxWriter. See Working with Autofilters for a more detailed explanation of autofilters.

_images/pandas_autofilter.png
##############################################################################
#
# An example of converting a Pandas dataframe to an xlsx file with an
# autofilter and filtered data. See also autofilter.py.
#
# Copyright 2013-2021, John McNamara, jmcnamara@cpan.org
#

import pandas as pd

# Create a Pandas dataframe by reading some data from a space-separated file.
df = pd.read_csv('autofilter_data.txt', sep=r'\s+')

# Create a Pandas Excel writer using XlsxWriter as the engine.
writer = pd.ExcelWriter('pandas_autofilter.xlsx', engine='xlsxwriter')

# Convert the dataframe to an XlsxWriter Excel object. We also turn off the
# index column at the left of the output dataframe.
df.to_excel(writer, sheet_name='Sheet1', index=False)

# Get the xlsxwriter workbook and worksheet objects.
workbook  = writer.book
worksheet = writer.sheets['Sheet1']

# Get the dimensions of the dataframe.
(max_row, max_col) = df.shape

# Make the columns wider for clarity.
worksheet.set_column(0,  max_col - 1, 12)

# Set the autofilter.
worksheet.autofilter(0, 0, max_row, max_col - 1)

# Add an optional filter criteria. The placeholder "Region" in the filter
# is ignored and can be any string that adds clarity to the expression.
worksheet.filter_column(0, 'Region == East')

# It isn't enough to just apply the criteria. The rows that don't match
# must also be hidden. We use Pandas to figure our which rows to hide.
for row_num in (df.index[(df['Region'] != 'East')].tolist()):
    worksheet.set_row(row_num + 1, options={'hidden': True})

# Close the Pandas Excel writer and output the Excel file.
writer.save()